10 misconceptions and facts about dogs

10 misconceptions and facts about dogs

Forget what you know about dog health and dog behavior. You want to give your dog his due. That's why you read everything that's been written about dogs. But despite all your well-intentioned efforts, some information that is not based on any scientific data is stuck in your brain. Just as people once had the idea that the earth was flat, you can't get rid of the idea that your dog is sick when it eats grass. Some canine health and behavior myths propounded by middle school children, well-meaning grandmothers, and self-professed canine experts still persist, even if researchers have already proven otherwise. After all, everyone knows something about dogs, and most of the time this piece of information doesn't do anyone any harm. But because the dog's nose is wet and cold, many people may have neglected other obvious signs of illness in his dog, or the number of people who were bitten by thinking that they were happy when the dog wagged its tail could be quite high. Below are the facts about the 10 most common dog myths. In short, forget what you know about dogs and make room for surprising facts. 1. A wet, dry nose indicates that the dog is healthy. However, a dog's nose is not a sure sign about his health. Normal body temperature in the dog is between 37.5 and 39.5 degrees; but veterinarians say that even if the dog's temperature rises to 40 degrees, his nose may be cold and wet. Never ignore other signs of illness in your dog, even if his nose is wet and dry. On the other hand, a dry nose should not cause you any fears. A nap on a hot summer afternoon can make your dog's nose quite dry. Always have plenty of fresh water available for your dog. If his nose continues for two to three days, or if there are other symptoms, consult your veterinarian. 2. Dogs eat grass when they are sick or have intestinal worms. Spring has come, and fresh green grass has emerged. During a walk, your dog ate as much fresh grass as he could catch with his lips. Then, just as he entered the house, the dog's lips trembled, his stomach twitched, and you heard the familiar sound of needing to buy a new carpet. Time to call the vet... right? It may not be necessary. It is perfectly normal for the dog to eat a small amount of grass. In fact, if dogs do not eat grass for a whole year, there are more problems. When they find fresh grass one day, they eat too much and cannot digest it. They vomit because a large amount of grass tires the digestive system. The owner then thinks that because the dog is sick, he ate grass to vomit. 3. Wagging its tail indicates that the dog is happy. But this is by no means certain. You should consider all the behavior of the dog. Because how the tail is wagged matters. A dominant and aggressive dog may also wag its tail, but its tail is upright. In friendly wagging, the tail is horizontal and wags really fast, and the entire back of the dog is wagged. When approaching an unfamiliar dog, examine all of its behavior. Signs of aggression may include growling, ears tilted back, stares, and a raised, slightly wagging tail. Because dogs communicate with each other through their tails, understanding the different uses of this highly mobile body extension can help strengthen the bond between you and your dog. 4. When dogs don't get enough of some nutrients, they eat feces, their own or another animal's. Unfortunately, there is no single explanation for this problem. Eating feces can be due to an internal organ disease, but also to a nutrient deficiency. But most of the time, it's behavioral. Young dogs can also just be a way of exploring nature. Usually, it's out of boredom. When the veterinarian examination reveals no medical problems, dog owners can try some ways before consulting a specialist. For dogs that loot the cat's litter box, removing the box to a high place or to a room where only the cat can enter may provide a solution. Bored dogs can be provided with more play and movement opportunities. Eliminate feces in the garden immediately or purchase sprays from dog food to prevent them from ingesting feces. They change the smell of the dog's feces, making it unattractive even for him. 5. If you want your dog's hair to be healthy and shiny, give him a raw egg. Those who once boasted strong muscles would gobble up raw eggs as a good source of protein. However, researchers were let down by their raw eggs when they discovered that the protein complex avidin, found in egg whites, reacts with and neutralizes biotin, a type of B-vitamin. Biotin deficiency has been seen in humans and animals that consume large amounts of raw egg whites. So, whatever your friend may say, if you want your dog's hair to be healthy and shiny, giving a high-quality food is a much more surefire way. Scrambled eggs have no such risk and can occasionally be given to dogs who are not prone to obesity. 6. Giving the dog garlic or brewer's yeast keeps fleas away. Many dog ​​owners believe in the effectiveness of such 'natural' flea remedies and give them to their dogs every year; however, there is no scientific basis for this, moreover, garlic given in excess is harmful to dogs. 7. Before being neutered, a female dog must have at least one mating or one calving. Millions of dogs are thrown into the streets and poisoned every year because of this myth. In addition to preventing unplanned pregnancies, spaying a female dog before her first heat also reduces her risk of some cancers. And contrary to popular belief, it is not necessary for the female dog to taste 'motherhood' at all. Dogs act on instinct and if reproductive hormones are removed by neutering, the dog will not need it to breed. 8. Dogs heal their wounds by licking them. Wound licking does indeed help clean the wound, and the thiocyanates found in the dog's saliva have some antiseptic effect, but excessive licking does more harm than good. Listen to your veterinarian's recommendations for wound healing. 9. Dogs only see in black and white. Trying to see the world with your dog is not as simple as watching a black and white movie. The dog's eye has a series of photoreceptors, or light receptors, that allow the animal to see. Some are rod-shaped, some are cone-shaped. Cone-shaped photoreceptors enable color vision. Dog eyes have much more rod-shaped photoreceptors than cone-shaped ones, so researchers used to think that dogs see only black and white. However, the results of research conducted at the University of California in the 1980s revealed a different reality: according to this, dogs can distinguish between a red ball and a blue ball, white light and colored lights, and shades between purple and blue. Green - yellow and orange - red. They cannot distinguish between colors. 10. Some breeds are hypoallergenic, such as poodles. Unfortunately there is no such solution. Some dog breeds shed less hair than others, but this does not relieve their owners' allergies. Allergic people often react to dandruff in the hair. As the dog licks itself, it drools onto its skin and hair. As it dries up, microscopic pieces of the saliva, namely dandruff, flake off, contaminating the air and the environment and affecting the dog owner. Despite this very painful process, the dog prefers regular grooming and house cleaning. Frequent shampooing of the dog can keep dandruff to a minimum, and frequent vacuuming of carpets and bedding can alleviate the problem. Even simply not letting the dog into the bedroom is incredibly comforting to many allergic people.